Category: Analysis

WHITELISTING: WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR? WELL, ACTUALLY QUITE A LOT, REALLY

In 2002, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld gave a speech about a lack of evidence linking the government of Iraq with the supply of weapons of mass destruction to terrorist groups. This speech was remarkable for one thing only, that being the inclusion of the phase “known knowns, unknown knowns, and unknown unknowns.” These concepts finally …

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CHANGING THE GUARD: GOODBYE FLEX WEB CLIENT—HELLO HTML5, BABY

They’re changing the guard at Buckingham Palace. This is a major tourist attraction in London, and the changing of the guard happens every Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday, weather permitting. “Changing the guard” is also a well-known refrain used to signify the complete change of an environment. VMware is currently undergoing such a transformation with …

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What the Windows CCleaner did!

CCleaner, a program owned by Avast, is the center of a major security scare. Why should you be worried? Well, this product is used by millions of Windows users worldwide to run maintenance on their registry and file systems on their consumer Windows machines. The product has had over two billion downloads in its lifetime, …

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GDPR: What is it, and Why should I care?

GDPR is a new set of European regulations that, in a nutshell, set out to codify how a data holder should secure and protect any personal data that they hold. Further, it also codifies the rights of the individual regarding any data held about them. Of course, it being a European regulation, it is obviously a …

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Round One in Social Media and First Amendment Rights

I recently wrote an article about a potential class action court case being brought against the President of the United States by the Knight Foundation. In the article, I posited that public servants who use their private social media accounts to make work-related statements may run the risk of causing their accounts to become public domain, considered …

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NotPetya: First Strike in a Cyperwar?

The law of international conflict is clear on when and how a state may invoke a state of armed conflict between sovereign nations. For example, in the US, the power to declare war is reserved for Congress, regardless of the President’s position as head of the US Armed Forces. It also dictates the reasons for …

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TWITTER AND THE RIGHT NOT TO BE BLOCKED

What follows in pure conjecture, and in no way constitutes legal opinion. It merely outlines one of many possible outcomes. An article in the New York Post on June 6 reported on a potential legal case aiming to force President Trump to unblock users he has blocked from seeing or tweeting to his timeline, either directly or by replying. …

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“NO THANKS, WE’RE TOO BUSY,” OR PAY BACK TECHNICAL DEBT?

We have all heard this refrain. I bet many of you can even hear yourselves saying it. Over my many years in IT, I have often heard this from coworkers, bosses, and clients. I have even said it a few times myself. But what if we just stopped and listened? Who knows where that conversation …

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Privacy: it is such a personal thing, Part 1

This is the first in a series of articles that outline the legal position on an individual’s right to privacy with regard to personal data held across the world. There is an implicit assumption that every individual has the right to privacy. In fact, you could say it is a human right. This right to …

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Like Cloud and Virtualization, Serverless Computng is still someone Else’s Computer

Today, serverless is all the rage. In the beginning, we had the server. Then along came virtualization, and things were good. We saved money. We could purchase less tin but run more servers. We could easily see the benefits of moving in that direction: lower power requirements, less hardware needing cooling down in our computer …

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