Sep 27

Docker has been in an acquisitivie mood again, this time pulling in Infinit

Docker, the leading vendor in the container industry, has been dipping into its pockets again, this time to acquire French file sync company Infinit. Yep, Docker, the company whose core product is a container management and deployment technology, is acquiring a consumer file sync company.

At first glance, this is an odd acquisition. Infinit is a company with a product that appears similar to Aspera, Accellion, or even good old-fashioned FTP. If you need to share your files, but email send or receive limits are getting in the way, Infinit allows you to create a Share directly to other Infinit users or a link that can be emailed to non–Infinit users to access your files directly, thereby allowing them to download them for review or further work.

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Sep 27

VMware Fusion on macOS High Sierra – System Extension Blocked

This is just a quick post about an issue you’ll see when installing VMware Fusion on macOS High Sierra.

During the install the following screen pops up.System Extension Blocked

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sep 26

Aquisitive Landesk bought out

The acquisitions have started early in 2017. It is only the fourth of January and we have our first major deal. The private investment firm Clearlake Capital has just shelled out a cool $1.1 billion for LANDESK.

In the past few years, LANDESK carved out a niche in the user virtualization market space, acquiring its major competitor and market leader AppSense in 2016, Xtraction Solutions in 2015, Naurtech and LetMoblie in 2014, and Shavlik from VMware in 2013.

Clearlake Capital has agreed to acquire LANDESK for a believed $1.1 billion in cash from Thoma Bravo and will be merging the company with its other UEM asset, HEAT Software USA.

The newly merged company, which is yet to be named, will be led by LANDESK CEO Steve Daly and headquartered in Utah. Current HEAT CEO and Clearlake Operating Advisor John Ferron will serve as the executive chairman of the newly merged company’s board.

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Sep 25

Amazon Web Services buries another Rival in the Cloud wars

The implacable march of Amazon Web Services toward ultimate public cloud domination has been relentless, from its inception in 2006 with a single service (S3 Storage) to the behemoth it has become today. It seems this minnow has become the biggest fish in the pond. But is it unstoppable? Has it won the public cloud wars?

That is still up for grabs. There are still some major players out there that could move. IBM Softlayer? Unlikely. Azure? Definitely. Oracle Cloud? Maybe. You will notice that Cisco is not there. This is because it has just pulled out of that market. Yes, Cisco is closing its $1 billion investment in its Intercloud product in March 2017. According to a Cisco source, it will be “moving current workloads into alternate infrastructure, including, in some cases, public clouds.” Cisco will follow in the veritable footsteps of former cloud illuminatus Rackspace, which is now effectively an AWS and Azure provider. Although VMware still has vCloud Air, now that it is on AWS play, it is effectively another AWS reseller/partner.

How this came to pass is a modern-day lesson in business ostrich syndrome, similar to what has become known as the “Kodak blindness.” Another company that displayed the same blindness is Nokia.

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Sep 24

Patent Trolls, Your time may finally be up

Patents are a valid protection against intellectual property theft. They are granted by the relevant authority on behalf of a sovereign state: for example, the US Patent Office in America, and the Patent Office in the UK. Once granted, patents assign exclusive rights to the assignee (inventor) for a limited period (usually twenty years) from the award of the patent.

This is a very strong protection of the inventor of a thing, as it prevents other, more established players from copying their ideas without licensing it. It is a valid and correct way of dealing with the protection of Ideas.

Unfortunately, over the last twenty years or so, the system has appeared to have begun falling apart and harming the very innovation that it was supposed to protect. Companies have sprung up that have a business model of buying up patents from dead companies and then suing other companies for infringements. Why do these people and companies chase these cases? Well, the rewards can be large for the victor and very damaging for the losing party.

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Sep 23

HP and the Journey to the Multiverse

In the beginning, there was Hewlett and there was Packard, and they formed a company called Hewlett-Packard (HP) and the rest, as they say, is history. Yes Hewlett-Packard picked up some companies along the way: DEC, Compaq, Autonomy, and EDS, to name a few. HP had its fingers in many pies, acquiring numerous technology companies while attempting to become a one-stop provider of everything: storage (3PAR, LeftHand Networks), compute (Compaq, Neoware), networking (Metrix Network Systems, Colubris Networks, 3Com, Aruba). It also acquired various software companies (Persist Technologies, Novadigm, RLX Technologies, Opsware, Autonomy) and professional service providers (Atos Origin Middle East Group, CGNZ, ManageOne, EDS), among others along the way. Things seemed to be going the right way for it, but then along came this slightly disruptive technology called virtualization. HP the hardware company weathered it. Now we are in the cloud era, and everybody is doing everything they can to become software defined, virtual SANs, virtual networks—the list goes on.

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Dec 29

HPE Discover

HPE had its own little conference called HP Discover this year, in the Excel Center in London. First a little disclaimer. I was invited to attend by Calvin Zito @HPEStorageguy (so thank you for that). That said, it will not affect my independence regarding technology. Now a little aside: one of the oddest things for those of us who are UK based is that even though this was a UK-based conference, we had to use European-to-UK power adapters.

I’m sure we voted for brexit

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Dec 27

Veeam Wins Significant Victory Over Patent Trolls

Just as Veeam has released its latest edition of Backup & Replication, v9.5, it has also finally emerged from the shadow of a patent case completely vindicated. The case could have been very painful for Veeam had it gone the other way.

Veeam wins the war of the patents against Symantec/Veritas

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Dec 23

Symantec Expands Security Offerings

Symantec has expanded its portfolio by acquiring identity protection firm LifeLock with a $2.3 billion dip into its pockets. Since Symantec divested itself of Veritas at a loss to the Carlyle Group in 2015, it has been looking to move into new markets. It acquired Blue Coat in August for $4.65 billion, a move that was seen to enhance its enterprise offerings.

 

Symantec acquires LifeLock to expand its Norton business

The reason for the LifeLock acquisition is to bolster its consumer arm, Norton. Although currently profitable, Norton has been struggling with growth due to declining consumer PC sales. Traditionally, Norton has been bundled with new consumer OEM (original equipment manufacture) PCs in the hope that after the “free” year, the owner will just pay the subscription to keep the protection; this model been doubly hit due to declining PC sales and the rise of free antivirus protection from the likes of Free AVG.

Symantec acquires LiveLock to expand its Norton Business

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Dec 22

Oracle dip into their pockets again this time for Dyn

Oracle have been quietly building out their next generation cloud environments, building up a cloud practice with seasoned professionals that includes Ex-VCE, VMware and AWS personal.  They have released a completely new version of their IaaS layer cloud. Dipping into their not insignificant loose pocket change to make several key purchases or acquisitions this year.

Now in what should be their last acquisition of 2016 they have now acquired Dyn for an undisclosed amount; but according to Dan Primack, a former senior editor at Fortune it is expected to be in the region of $600million.

D

yn are a Manchester, New Hampshire based internet DNS provider founded in 1998, who have unfortunately recently been in the news for all the wrong reasons. They were the target of a massive DDoS attack in October that caused by a botnet using Mirai. Mirai is Malware that targeted Linux based systems and took down numerous high profile sites on the east coast of the USA including Spotify, New York Times, Twitter and eBay.   Whether this issue affected the purchase price is to date unknown.

Oracle acquires Dyn to Bolster their Cloud

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