Tag: Cloud

I HAVE A DREAM, A JOURNEY INTO SETTING UP A STARTUP COMPANY TODAY

“I have a dream” is what Martin Luther King Jr. said, and admittedly, his was at least an order of magnitude larger than the dreams of an average company founder. But all companies start with a dream. Dreams are great: in them, you can invariably be invincible, conquer every challenge. However, such dreams can quickly turn to nightmares, if you are not careful. A startup is like a dream.

What follows is an idea or a series of ideas: a roadmap, perhaps. Not a freeway, but more of a winding country lane that is hopefully a joy to drive down. Still, it is not without danger—perhaps a mudslide is caused by a sudden deluge, or a deer, alpaca, or kangaroo suddenly runs out into the road. This is a journey into setting up a startup technology company, from the perspective of technology. Do you buy on-site infrastructure, move wholly into public cloud, or perhaps do a mixture of both? If cloud, what particular ’aaS do you partake of—platform, infrastructure, software, or any number of the other flavours that now abound?

The first mistake that the average founder makes when starting a company is to rush headlong into the making of things, be that widgets to fit a sprocket, consultancy days, or what ever else is used to generate revenue. This is expected; you are suddenly the master of your own destiny, and cash flow reigns. However, and this is important, before you even start to earn, there are many things that you should complete, apart from the obvious things like opening your business bank account, getting a good accountant, and incorporating your company. Things like choosing and setting up email, office applications, collaboration software. Timesheets, bookkeeping software, payroll. Customer records database and management.

Previously Published on TVP Strategy (The Virtualization Practice

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Like Cloud and Virtualization, Serverless Computng is still someone Else’s Computer

Today, serverless is all the rage. In the beginning, we had the server. Then along came virtualization, and things were good. We saved money. We could purchase less tin but run more servers. We could easily see the benefits of moving in that direction: lower power requirements, less hardware needing cooling down in our computer rooms. This was an easy sell for engineers and salespeople alike. Techies loved the elegance, and the business types loved the financial savings. The messaging was easily understandable.

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