Are Containers a first class citizen in the enterprise?

VMware have recently finished their annual VMworld conference. One of their major announcements was that of Project Pacific. This is VMware’s biggest vSphere announcement since the the introduction of their ESXi product back in 2007.

What are containers to Project Pacific?

Project Pacific is effectively a complete rewrite of vSphere to become a Kubernetes deployment engine. What this effectively means is that VMware have made Containers first-class citizens on their platform. Yes it is true that VMware has supported containers in the past, firstly with VMware VIC (Virtual Integrated Containers) then later with VMware PKS (Pivotal Container Service), but these have been very much add-ons to their core product, and seen as an adjunct to Virtual Machines rather than as a fully paid up member of the enterprise club.

Project Pacific
,  VMware move to be an Application platform (copyright VMware)

VMware have struggled with Containers, chiefly because at their enterprise tipping point they were seen as the more valid answer to the then current issues that enterprises needed solving over fledgling container technology from Unix Vendors like Sun MicroSystems (bought by Oracle) with their Solaris Zones product.

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create a macOS Catalina VM with VMware Fusion

Update: This is no longer an issue with Fusion 11.5

Here’s a quick note on how-to setup a macOS catalina VM on VMware Fusion 11. Credit for figuring out how-to do this goes to vmtn users Bogdam and intel008 as they are the ones who posted the resolution in the following thread at VMTN: macOS Catalina VMs do not run in VMware Fusion 11.1.0

This thread describes the problems you bump into if you try to upgrade a macOS Mojave VM to the new beta macOS Catalina. Basically if you run the upgrade then your VM will hang on reboot. If you then try to reboot it in verbose mode, so that you can see what happens, you’ll get the following screen.

macOS Catalina boot error

Yikes, that’s no good!

Continue reading “create a macOS Catalina VM with VMware Fusion”

Notes on securing Meltdown and Spectre

Now that the dust is slightly starting to settle It became clear to me that there’s an enormous amount of information and confusion out there. I have read a lot of websites in order to get a clear picture and being able to get all of my hosts and Virtual Machines patched. While not completely done yet, here’s my collection of links and some answers on questions that I see asked often. This is a live document and will be updated with notes relevant for patching. Last update 2018/01/29 Continue reading “Notes on securing Meltdown and Spectre”

Monitor storage for a Dell PERC H710 Mini on vSphere 6.5

So I managed to get myself some DELL R320 servers for the lab. Great servers, love that R3x0 series, they fit my needs perfectly. In previous R3xx series and vSphere versions using the “thick” vSphere client you could just monitor the storage (PERC H710 mini) and other hardware so that you could easily find out if your server needs maintenance.

Continue reading “Monitor storage for a Dell PERC H710 Mini on vSphere 6.5”

Tis the Season to be Jolly and heres a little Christmas Gift from Cormac and Duncan the VSAN Elves

Tis the season to be Jolly, and here is a little festive treat from Santa’s little VSAN helpers Cormac Hogan and Duncan Epping.

Holiday gift: vSAN Essentials book available for free

or from

https://cormachogan.com/2017/12/19/vsan-essentials-e-book-now-free/

VSAN as we know is VMware Software defined storage solution that is integrated at the VMkernal level and a core component in SDDC and vxRAILs.  This is a serious tome about all things VSAN 6.2, (yes we are at VSAN 6.5 but this book is still relevant)

So mosy on over to either of the two sites and download the book, I can vouch for it. these too folk know their stuff.

VSAN Comes of Age with Version 6.2

On February 10, 2016, VMware announced VSAN v6.2. This is the forth generation of its flagship software-defined storage (SDS) product to be released. At the time of the release, VMware announced that it has more than 3,000 customers running the products; that is quite a number.

Now, to me, it is a misnomer for this to have been given a minor release notation, as there are a slew of new features, some of which are more than worthy of a major release cycle. I will examine the major ones in this article.

 

VSAN 6.2

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VCP Foundation Exam

With the release of vSphere 6, VMware have updated the exam structure as normal. This time there are a couple of interesting (to me at least) changes.

The first is to bring the VCP-NV more in line with the other VCP exams. It now has a consistent structure with the DCV (Data Centre), CMA (Cloud) and DTM (Desktop) variants with the same requirements (except for the additional “Cisco Certified” Route which bypasses the course requirement. This looks like it will stay until the end of January 2016), and with a foundation exam, it tests some general vSphere knowledge as well as just the NSX side. Continue reading “VCP Foundation Exam”

VSAN is Great, but their Licensing Sucks

On April 1st I tweeted that


And I still stand by this remark. Building and configuring a New VSAN is simple, even if you have to spend most of the morning in 4 machines LSI Bios configuring several single disk RAID0 groups and associated vDisks and then manually marking your SSD as such in ESXCLI. Continue reading “VSAN is Great, but their Licensing Sucks”

Remember Remember, Edit your Host Profile before applying.

Well today I remembered something, well to be truthful, I remembered it five minutes after moving my new hosts into maintenance mode, applying my newly created host profile from my reference host, filling in the network details for all the port groups and VMkernel groups and clicking finish.

So what exactly did I remember? Well I remembered that before you apply a reference host profile to a host that is over 6000 miles away (well to be fair, even if it is under your desk or hosted on your desktop), always remember to remove the policy that relates to your primary management console. Why? I hear you ask.

rug Continue reading “Remember Remember, Edit your Host Profile before applying.”

End of General Support for vSphere 4.x

The 21st of May 2014 was a big day in the life of vSphere 4.x as it marked the official beginning of the end.  The product and its associated pieces are no longer under general support. this means that security fixes only from now on. Therefore if you have not started your upgrade plan now is the time to do so.  You need to be looking at moving up your version.

Other products that are added to this are Lab manager 4.x, vCenter 4.x, vCenter Update manager 4.x,

The document below shows the current status of VMware products:

https://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/support/Product-Lifecycle-Matrix.pdf