Category: VMware

Notes on securing Meltdown and Spectre

Now that the dust is slightly starting to settle It became clear to me that there’s an enormous amount of information and confusion out there. I have read a lot of websites in order to get a clear picture and being able to get all of my hosts and Virtual Machines patched. While not completely done yet, here’s my collection of links and some answers on questions that I see asked often. This is a live document and will be updated with notes relevant for patching. Last update 2018/01/29 Continue reading “Notes on securing Meltdown and Spectre”

Monitor storage for a Dell PERC H710 Mini on vSphere 6.5

So I managed to get myself some DELL R320 servers for the lab. Great servers, love that R3x0 series, they fit my needs perfectly. In previous R3xx series and vSphere versions using the “thick” vSphere client you could just monitor the storage (PERC H710 mini) and other hardware so that you could easily find out if your server needs maintenance.

Continue reading “Monitor storage for a Dell PERC H710 Mini on vSphere 6.5”

Tis the Season to be Jolly and heres a little Christmas Gift from Cormac and Duncan the VSAN Elves

Tis the season to be Jolly, and here is a little festive treat from Santa’s little VSAN helpers Cormac Hogan and Duncan Epping.

Holiday gift: vSAN Essentials book available for free

or from

vSAN Essentials e-book is now free

VSAN as we know is VMware Software defined storage solution that is integrated at the VMkernal level and a core component in SDDC and vxRAILs.  This is a serious tome about all things VSAN 6.2, (yes we are at VSAN 6.5 but this book is still relevant)

So mosy on over to either of the two sites and download the book, I can vouch for it. these too folk know their stuff.

VSAN Comes of Age with Version 6.2

On February 10, 2016, VMware announced VSAN v6.2. This is the forth generation of its flagship software-defined storage (SDS) product to be released. At the time of the release, VMware announced that it has more than 3,000 customers running the products; that is quite a number.

Now, to me, it is a misnomer for this to have been given a minor release notation, as there are a slew of new features, some of which are more than worthy of a major release cycle. I will examine the major ones in this article.

 

VSAN 6.2

Read More

VCP Foundation Exam

With the release of vSphere 6, VMware have updated the exam structure as normal. This time there are a couple of interesting (to me at least) changes.

The first is to bring the VCP-NV more in line with the other VCP exams. It now has a consistent structure with the DCV (Data Centre), CMA (Cloud) and DTM (Desktop) variants with the same requirements (except for the additional “Cisco Certified” Route which bypasses the course requirement. This looks like it will stay until the end of January 2016), and with a foundation exam, it tests some general vSphere knowledge as well as just the NSX side. Continue reading “VCP Foundation Exam”

VSAN is Great, but their Licensing Sucks

On April 1st I tweeted that


And I still stand by this remark. Building and configuring a New VSAN is simple, even if you have to spend most of the morning in 4 machines LSI Bios configuring several single disk RAID0 groups and associated vDisks and then manually marking your SSD as such in ESXCLI. Continue reading “VSAN is Great, but their Licensing Sucks”

Remember Remember, Edit your Host Profile before applying.

Well today I remembered something, well to be truthful, I remembered it five minutes after moving my new hosts into maintenance mode, applying my newly created host profile from my reference host, filling in the network details for all the port groups and VMkernel groups and clicking finish.

So what exactly did I remember? Well I remembered that before you apply a reference host profile to a host that is over 6000 miles away (well to be fair, even if it is under your desk or hosted on your desktop), always remember to remove the policy that relates to your primary management console. Why? I hear you ask.

rug Continue reading “Remember Remember, Edit your Host Profile before applying.”

End of General Support for vSphere 4.x

The 21st of May 2014 was a big day in the life of vSphere 4.x as it marked the official beginning of the end.  The product and its associated pieces are no longer under general support. this means that security fixes only from now on. Therefore if you have not started your upgrade plan now is the time to do so.  You need to be looking at moving up your version.

Other products that are added to this are Lab manager 4.x, vCenter 4.x, vCenter Update manager 4.x,

The document below shows the current status of VMware products:

https://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/support/Product-Lifecycle-Matrix.pdf

VMware’s purchase of AirWatch

The announcement by VMware of their intent to acquire Airwatch an Atlanta based company in a $1.5B purchase is a very shrewd move on VMware’s part. This deal compises of $1.175B in Cash and $365M in as stated by the press release “Instalment payments and assumed unvested equity”.

Airwatch’s main value proposition was in Mobile device management, their device reach was impressive, with being able to manage; apple, symbian, blackberry, Android and Windows devices, further the ability to manage Desktops is a bonus, AirWatch together with Citrix are seen as a leaders in the EMM space and is placed in the Leaders quadrant by Gartner on their Magic quadrant graph for the market.

In one fowl swoop VMware will fill an obvious gap in their EUC proposition, answering the final questions about their commitment and dedication to the EUC market place.  It also closes the gap between them and Citrix their major competitor in the EUC market in protecting the endpoint, further the Airwatch acquisition will give VMware basic capability to manage laptop devices, opening up the ability to offer BYOD management into their portfolio.

It could be argued that this purchase was reactive and as a result of IBM and Citrix moving in this space with their acquisitions of FibreLink,, MasS360 and Zenprise respectively, however I do this is a positive move on VMware’s part firming up their EUC offerings and tightening the end point security.