Category: miscellaneous

AWS bits and pieces – my journey to Certification

What is AWS?

Amazon Web Services or AWS is the worlds leading provider of IaaS public cloud.  it is also  not a single thing, it is made up of many different services, and is accessible from several locations across the world these locations are called Regions..

Currently AWS has 18 Regions these are shown below. It is important to remember that not all AWS services are available in every Region.

Region Name

Region

Protocol

US East (Ohio)

us-east-2

HTTPS

US East (N. Virginia)

us-east-1

HTTPS

US West (N. California)

us-west-1

HTTPS

US West (Oregon)

us-west-2

HTTPS

Asia Pacific (Tokyo)

ap-northeast-1

HTTPS

Asia Pacific (Seoul)

ap-northeast-2

HTTPS

Asia Pacific (Osaka-Local)

ap-northeast-3

HTTPS

Asia Pacific (Mumbai)

ap-south-1

HTTPS

Asia Pacific (Singapore)

ap-southeast-1

HTTPS

Asia Pacific (Sydney)

ap-southeast-2

HTTPS

Canada (Central)

ca-central-1

HTTPS

China (Beijing) *

cn-north-1

HTTPS

China (Ningxia) *

cn-northwest-1

HTTPS

EU (Frankfurt)

eu-central-1

HTTPS

EU (Ireland)

eu-west-1

HTTPS

EU (London)

eu-west-2

HTTPS

EU (Paris)

eu-west-3

HTTPS

South America (Sao Paulo)

sa-east-1

HTTPS

  • These regions are only available in China and only be accessed by Republic of China companies and citizens.

A Region is broken down in to a number of Availability Zones. The number of availability zones varies from region to region, ie there are more availability zones on more mature regions.

regions

Availability Zones are identified by the appending of a alpha character to the end of a zone name for example ap-southeast-2a. which related to an availability zone in the Sydney Region.

It is also important to know that availability groups are not immutable, what is your availability zone “a” is not necessarily the same zone for another customer. Also there is now way to coordinate Availability Zones between accounts.

That is a high level overview of the AWS infrastructure,

In my next post we will start looking into the numerous services and functions that are available across the AWS suite. It is should also be noted that AWS are constantly introducing new and enhancing their current services and functions. Also these services and functions are also being rolled out to new regions from their initial launch region.

Tis the Season to be Jolly and heres a little Christmas Gift from Cormac and Duncan the VSAN Elves

Tis the season to be Jolly, and here is a little festive treat from Santa’s little VSAN helpers Cormac Hogan and Duncan Epping.

Holiday gift: vSAN Essentials book available for free

or from

vSAN Essentials e-book is now free

VSAN as we know is VMware Software defined storage solution that is integrated at the VMkernal level and a core component in SDDC and vxRAILs.  This is a serious tome about all things VSAN 6.2, (yes we are at VSAN 6.5 but this book is still relevant)

So mosy on over to either of the two sites and download the book, I can vouch for it. these too folk know their stuff.

VMware rolls back its boarders with a flash sale of vCloud Air

In a not-too-unexpected move, VMware has announced the sale of its Public Cloud division. It is well-known that vCloud Air has been struggling. In a deal expected to close in Q2 2017 they have offloaded it to French Cloud hosting provider OVH. OVH defines itself as one of the largest cloud service providers in the world, with 1 million customers and 260,000 servers deployed, so roughly a quarter of a server per customer. I am pretty sure that Oracle, AWS, Google, and Azure are bigger, but there you go. Marketing at its best — OVH, one of the largest cloud service providers in the world.

———————— Read More ————-

Docker has been in an acquisitivie mood again, this time pulling in Infinit

Docker, the leading vendor in the container industry, has been dipping into its pockets again, this time to acquire French file sync company Infinit. Yep, Docker, the company whose core product is a container management and deployment technology, is acquiring a consumer file sync company.

At first glance, this is an odd acquisition. Infinit is a company with a product that appears similar to Aspera, Accellion, or even good old-fashioned FTP. If you need to share your files, but email send or receive limits are getting in the way, Infinit allows you to create a Share directly to other Infinit users or a link that can be emailed to non–Infinit users to access your files directly, thereby allowing them to download them for review or further work.

———————–Read More ——

A Bit of History Repeats Itself: CSC Buys HPE Technology Services Division

In 2008, HP (now part of the newly split-off HPE) bought Electronic Data Systems (EDS) for $13.9 billion, a massive amount for what at the time was one of the biggest IT services players in the market space, behind IBM. This was whilst HP’s services division languished in fifth place, behind both Accenture and Fujitsu.

CSC and HPE
CSC Aquires HPE Technology Services Division

At the time of the deal, it was said that it was too big a merger: a little bit like a whitebait eating a whale. The power of the deal was obvious. HP as an IT services player was catapulted to second place in revenue. It was generally thought to be a good deal, as the majority of the heavy lifting to transform EDS had already been done by the management team led by Michael Jordan.

to Continue Reading

Cost to Build a New Virtualized Data Center

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been thinking about costs relating to a building a new virtualization-based data center. “What?” I hear you say. “Everywhere is virtualized—there is no such thing as a greenfield site anymore!” I would have said that myself, but in the last month I have come across three, one of which is a company worth over a billion pounds.

During a conversation I had with that company, they informed me that they were going to use a certain vendor for their hypervisor, because it was cheaper. This got me thinking: how much cheaper is it, really? As a result, this is the first in a series of articles looking at a generic cost breakdown for a general-purpose virtualization infrastructure.

read more

The Godfather of NSX Leaves His Baby in Good Hands to Help Other Embryos

In a shock announcement on Wednesday, Martin Casado announced that he was leaving VMware’s Networking and Security business unit, the group that owns the NSX product, to join the venture capitalist firm Andreessen Horowitz as a general partner. Casado was co-founder and CTO of Nicira, the network company that VMware brought for $1.2 billion in 2012.

This closes the circle for Martin, whose first institutional investor at Nicira was Andreessen Horowitz. Ben Horowitz of the company served on Nicira’s board and acted as Casado’s business mentor.

Will Casado make a good venture capitalist? That remains to be seen, but I think he has a very good grounding and understands the culture of Andreessen Horowitz. The firm tends to like partners who have walked the walk, in terms of living the startup life. This, coupled with the firm’s history with Casado, makes it a good fit.

In fact that Casado did not jump ship when VMware purchased Nicira and became the general manager of VMware’s Networking and Security business unit has filled out his business credentials, especially after taking the unit from a standing start to a $600M run rate.

read more

VSAN Comes of Age with Version 6.2

On February 10, 2016, VMware announced VSAN v6.2. This is the forth generation of its flagship software-defined storage (SDS) product to be released. At the time of the release, VMware announced that it has more than 3,000 customers running the products; that is quite a number.

Now, to me, it is a misnomer for this to have been given a minor release notation, as there are a slew of new features, some of which are more than worthy of a major release cycle. I will examine the major ones in this article.

 

VSAN 6.2

Read More