Tag: vmware

AWS and VMware Now Friends, but What Happens to vCloud Air?

Recently, at VMworld Barcelona 2106, VMware announced a partnership with AWS to provide an SDDC based on Cloud Foundation on AWS hardware hosted in AWS regional data centers. This environment is a pure VMware play, but using AWS hardware. I had a number of conversations at the conference regarding this announcement, and the consensus appeared to be “Interesting, but we need to know more.”

VMware loves AWS
VMware gets into bed with AWS—but what about vCloud Air?

Cost was the main question. How will this be priced? Gelsinger intimated that existing customers will be able to leverage their current vSphere licensing to consume the AWS vCloud. This raised additional questions. How exactly do you leverage a CapEx-based perpetual license to a consumption-based OpEx cost? There is little to no information on this. We would like a lot more clarity. We appreciate that it is currently only a technical preview, but if it is going to be utilized on release, budgets need to be planned.

Read More

VMware: Was VMworld Barcelona a swan song or a Rally to Arms?

VMware’s VMworld conference season is now over. Its Barcelona shindig has just finished and everybody has flown home, is flying home, or is winding down on the beaches of the Catalonian coast pending the upcoming OpenStack summit. I did not attend the Las Vegas event; however, from what I have gathered from speaking to folks who attended and from reading about it, it was not well received. Complaints included a lack of new releases and what at first glance appeared to be muddled messaging and poor keynotes. However, fast-forward to VMworld Barcelona, and you could not have had a more night-and-day moment.

Historically, VMware’s European conference has been lackluster ever since it was moved from its original late-February slot to its current Autumn resting-place, October. The larger US conference had a larger audience, lasted longer, had all the important new releases, and got first shout at the keynotes. Not this time. VMworld Barcelona was extended by an extra day, and more importantly, it got all the major announcements: vSphere 6.5, VSAN 6.5, vRealize Automation and Operations, a new version of Log Insight, and the biggie, vCloud on AWS. Further, rather than being able to sit in the hang space and mouth out the keynote in time with Pat’s speech, Europe got brand-new keynotes.

vmworldeurope
VMware: Was VMworld Barcelona a swan song or a rally to arms?

to read more

VMware becomes more laser-focused, selling two business units.

Some might say that the carve-up has begun, now that the Dell/EMC merger has been finalized. VMware has divested itself of two new business units: namely, the Business Enterprise and IT Benchmarking units, which it bought in 2011 when it acquired Digital Fuel. Remember, this was during VMware’s acquisition phase under former CEO Paul Maritz, during which it acquired companies including Shavlik, SpringSource, Socialcast, and Zimbra, amongst several others.

vmware-logo-new-2009-400
VMware divests itself of two more business units

To read more

It’s the lead up to VMworld Barcelona

VMworld Las Vegas 2016 could not have come at a worse time for Californian Dude VMware, being as it was just before the September 7th nuptials of their New England Daddy EMC and the Texan Dell. (see what I did there)

There are many saying as usual that the writing is on the wall for VMware, they have lost their way, the IBM of the Millennial generation. Watching from afar (the less said about being afar the better, but at least my back is healing) gives a slightly different perspective, not being dazzled by the bright lights of conference or being subsumed in the cacophony means that you can more clearly see the chaff from the corn and perhaps spot a direction in what at first seems nothing but random white noise.

VMworld-2016
VMworld Barcelona 2016

To continue reading

All Your SDN Are Belong to Us

One of the frustrations of SDN has always been the fact that if you ask six different people for a definition of SDN, you’ll get ten different answers, at least. This stems in part from the usual IT buzzword symptoms. When a system is used for competitive advantage, each company wants to define its own brand of “The Thing”—to try to “own” the thing and become the de facto standard for it. There is also a deeper issue with SDN, precisely because it is networking.

When we talk about “the network,” we often think of one thing: one set of interconnected computers. Sometimes we think of the internet: of many interconnected networks. In reality, there are many different networks that even the smallest of companies use every day now. Each of these has different needs, different solutions, and different flavours of SDN. Add into that public and hybrid cloud, and we have many, many networks in use. Some of these we have control over, but many of them we don’t. However, that doesn’t mean that SDN isn’t playing its part.

To continue reading

Dell EMC: The Big Day

Yesterday, after many worries—some regulatory (Would the EU sanction the deal? Would China sanction the deal?), some legal (Were the financial instruments being used to finance the deal unlawful under the US tax code?)—the biggest IT merger ever in terms of monetary value finally occurred. This is one of those landmark occasions. Two of the biggest names in our industry, Dell and EMC2, have merged to become Dell Technologies.

DellTechnologies
Dell Technologies

To Continue Reading

NSX – The Saga Continues

I’ve written before about the difficulty as a user of getting hold of VMware’s NSX and about other problems with the release, but a small recap is in order. Founded in 2007, Nicira was bought by VMware in 2012 for its SDN platform. This consists of deep integration that combines the open VXLAN standard with vSphere’s vShield-like products and some other bit of magic to yield a fully functioning microsegmentation system. Although Nicira is available for OpenStack, too, VMware’s focus has always been on the vSphere implementation and using NSX, combined with some of the vShield products to replace VMware’s own vCNS (vCloud Networking and Security). This $1 billion acquisition has been with VMware for as long as Nicira existed as a company. By now, we would expect it to simply be another part of the VMware product line.

Many years ago, when VMware was a little-known start-up, one of the biggest factors in the growth of its hypervisor was the ability of systems administrators to get ahold of the product and play with it. The trial licenses enabled the full product set, which was unusual at the time, and were simply time-limited. The VMTN subscription included non-production licenses for testing. This, combined with the previously unknown willingness of VMware staff to interact on the company’s forum led to an immense community of enthusiasts who wanted to use the product and practically begged their bosses to bring it in.

To continue reading

A Busy Week for Acquisitions

Most people have heard about recent Microsoft’s recent $26.2B acquisition of LinkedIn. You may also be aware of VMware’s purchase of Arkin and Symantec’s of Blue Coat, which they announced on June 13. My colleague Edward Haletky discusses these acquisitions here. CenturyLink announced its purchase of ElasticBox on June 14. June 16 brought further announcements of acquisitions, these being Samsung’s purchase of Joyent and Cavium’s acquisition of QLogic.

First, let’s look at the easier of the two purchases to understand, Cavium’s acquisition of QLogic. Cavium is most likely one of those companies whose product you are using all the time without knowing it. For example, if you own certain Linksys devices or your company runs a Citrix MPX or a Blue Coat packet shaper, you are using Cavium technology.

To Continue Reading

Has AWS Peaked

There can be no real arguing against the fact that Amazon Web Services reigns supreme with regard to public cloud. Its recently announced quarterly results show that AWS is not only gaining revenue, but actually making a “small” surplus. OK, maybe not so small: a tad over half a billion dollars, compared to a $57 million loss for the same quarter in 2015.

What I have found interesting whilst watching it grow is how much like VMware it has become. I can hear you all saying, “It is nothing like VMware.” But please hear me out. AWS’s growth cycle is very similar. Why do I say this?

AWS has become the de facto leader in public cloud in a manner similar to the way VMware dominated the on-premises data center after 2004. Like VMware, AWS has delivered on the early mover advantage. This does not mean that it will continue to dominate, but more on that later.

to Continue Reading