Tag: AWS

PERTH IS LOVELY TO VISIT, BUT IT’S NOT CLOUDY: SD-WAN TO THE RESCU

On February 19, my colleague Edward Haletky wrote a piece on scale. In it, he highlights that scale is not just about 20,000 desktops and 3,000 virtual hosts. Rather, there are many other metrics that could and should be considered with regard to scale.

I am currently living in Perth in Western Australia. Perth holds a rather dubious record in that is it is the most remote capital city in the world. “Wait, Canberra is the capital of Australia,” you might say, and you would be correct. However, Australia operates in a federal manner and is made up of states and territories, and Perth is the capital of Western Australia. Why am I saying all this? One word, really: cloud. Living in Perth, our nearest AWSAzure, and GCP zones are in Sydney, 3,300 kilometers (2,000 miles) away on the east coast. Oracle Cloud? Again, Sydney. OVH? Yes, Sydney. Softlayer? Wait, it has a zone in Melbourne, but that is still 2,700 kilometers (1,700 miles) from Perth. As you can see, we are quite isolated. Physics rather than doctrine limits Perth’s access to public cloud.

Previously Published on TVP Strategy (The Virtualization Practice)

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Managing a Multicloud

There is no denying that the future of cloud is not just with a single provider, capable as AzureAWS and the other public providers are. For true data protection, your information needs to be in three separate locations, and with the rise of data sovereignty, there is a need for data to be kept within the boundaries of a nation-state. GDPR will place other obligations on companies and their data compliance. Smaller countries will suffer more than larger ones, with their multiple regions and zones per country per cloud provider. Smaller countries like the UK will have problems, as a single provider will not have three regions for true resiliency. Microsoft, for example, will have two regions in the UK for Azure (London and Cardiff) and two for Office 365 (Durham and London). Amazon will only have a single AWS zone: London. (Europe retains Frankfurt, Ireland, and Paris.) The other public cloud providers do not fare much better. Post-GDPR, data sovereignty will be front and center. So, what exactly can you do if you want, need, or desire to be totally in the public cloud: sell your customers in Europe and the world and not fall foul of transnational data-protection laws? A multicloud may be the answer.

Multicloud Puppet Master

Let’s look quickly at the main market providers: India, China, and the US. How they can remain compliant?

Previously Published on TVP Strategy (The Virtualization Practice)

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AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner – 1.1 Define the AWS Cloud and its value proposition

1.1 Define the AWS cloud and its value proposition

Definition of the AWS Cloud

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a secure public services platform that offers a number of services including compute power (EC2), database (RDS), storage (S3), and other functionality to help businesses scale and grow without the need to own phyiscal hardware or expensive datacenters. Many customers currently leverage AWS cloud products and solutions to build sophisticated infrastructures and applications which have increased flexibility, scalability and reliability for their businesses.

AWS Cloud provides a broad set of infrastructure services (currently there are over 100 services are available),

AWS Services as of 9th April 2018
AWS Services as of 9th April 2018

such as computing power, storage options, networking and databases, delivered as a utility: on-demand, available in seconds, with pay-as-you-go pricing, there is also a free tier that give 750 hours of usage a month so that you can dip your toe in.

It is available with 44 availability zones within 18 geographic regions across the world (this includes the specialist GOV region, and the two Chinese only regions. – with 5 more regions announced.

AWS have a good standard of security certification and accreditation, with data encryption at rest and in-transit, hardware security modules and strong physical security which all contribute to a more secure way to manage a company’s business’ IT infrastructure.

With the built-in capabilities for controlling, auditing and managing identity, configuration and usage which come built into the platform. Will aid customers to meet their compliance, governance and regulatory requirements.

The AWS Value Proposition Edit

below is the synopsis of the AWS value proposition.

Principle Concepts
Agility Speed

Experimentation

Innovation

Cost Eliminate upfront investments

Economy of scale

Only pay for what you use

Elasticity Scale on demand

Eliminate wasted capacity

Flexibility Broad set of products

Low to no cost to entry

Security Amazon has acquired many certifications

Shared responsibility model

That said,  unless so transformation is undertaken, the accounts department will be getting some nightmarish usage bills 😊

AWS Leads by a furlong, but Azure is Rapidly gaining ground

At the time of this writing (in early April), one of the biggest days in the UK horseracing calendar, Aintree’s Grand National Day, was upcoming. This seemed to me prophetic, as people often state that AWS is the leader in a one-horse race. Historically, yes, it has often appeared to be in a one-horse race, smashing competitors left, right, and center—first humiliating VMware, the godparent of the cloud, by beating it at its own game, then by crushing other, more traditional companies’ cloud aspirations without thought.

Many believed this battle, if not the war, had been well and truly won and that AWS was the victor. It had even clipped the wings of Google.

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Moving home and troublesome files: issue with cross-cloud

You may or may not be aware that I have just moved house, and, me being me, I have not done it by halves. My family and I up’d sticks to the other side of the world, and we landed in Perth—not Scotland, but Australia. Call it a cross-cloud migration; this obviously was fraught with difficulties and did not go as smoothly as planned. This has got me thinking about moving home in a cloud environment, whether from site to site, region to region, or cloud provider to cloud provider. In a perfect world, this should be as simple as live migration is today between like-minded virtualization hosts: VMware to VMware, Hyper-V to Hyper-V. The unfortunate truth is that this is not the case

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Amazon Web Services buries another Rival in the Cloud wars

The implacable march of Amazon Web Services toward ultimate public cloud domination has been relentless, from its inception in 2006 with a single service (S3 Storage) to the behemoth it has become today. It seems this minnow has become the biggest fish in the pond. But is it unstoppable? Has it won the public cloud wars?

That is still up for grabs. There are still some major players out there that could move. IBM Softlayer? Unlikely. Azure? Definitely. Oracle Cloud? Maybe. You will notice that Cisco is not there. This is because it has just pulled out of that market. Yes, Cisco is closing its $1 billion investment in its Intercloud product in March 2017. According to a Cisco source, it will be “moving current workloads into alternate infrastructure, including, in some cases, public clouds.” Cisco will follow in the veritable footsteps of former cloud illuminatus Rackspace, which is now effectively an AWS and Azure provider. Although VMware still has vCloud Air, now that it is on AWS play, it is effectively another AWS reseller/partner.

How this came to pass is a modern-day lesson in business ostrich syndrome, similar to what has become known as the “Kodak blindness.” Another company that displayed the same blindness is Nokia.

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AWS and VMware Now Friends, but What Happens to vCloud Air?

Recently, at VMworld Barcelona 2106, VMware announced a partnership with AWS to provide an SDDC based on Cloud Foundation on AWS hardware hosted in AWS regional data centers. This environment is a pure VMware play, but using AWS hardware. I had a number of conversations at the conference regarding this announcement, and the consensus appeared to be “Interesting, but we need to know more.”

VMware loves AWS
VMware gets into bed with AWS—but what about vCloud Air?

Cost was the main question. How will this be priced? Gelsinger intimated that existing customers will be able to leverage their current vSphere licensing to consume the AWS vCloud. This raised additional questions. How exactly do you leverage a CapEx-based perpetual license to a consumption-based OpEx cost? There is little to no information on this. We would like a lot more clarity. We appreciate that it is currently only a technical preview, but if it is going to be utilized on release, budgets need to be planned.

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News: AT&T Teams with AWS to Offer On-Demand Network-Enabled Cloud Solutions

On October 2, 2014, AT&T partnered with Amazon Web Services to offer on-demand network-enabled cloud solutions to its customers via AWS and AT&T NetBond.

This is an interesting departure from the usual rounds of tit-for-tat, race-to-the-bottom announcements that AWS, Google’s cloud service, and others release. This announcement comes hot on the tail of Google’s latest cost reductions for customers. AWS has added a service improvement and soon (well, sometime in early 2015) will have the means to give all of its customers direct access to AWS services from the tech giant’s NetBond cloud integration platform.

To read more click here