Tag: citrix

Cost to Build a New Virtualized Data Center, Part 2b

In part one of Cost to Build a New Virtualized Data Center, we discussed the basic software costs for a virtualized data center based on VMware vSphere 6.0, Citrix XenServer 6.5, Microsoft Hyper-V 2012 R2 and 2016, and Red Hat. If you missed that, please click here to review before continuing.

Part 2a of this series concentrated on Hyper-V 2012 R2 and 2016 as well as vSphere 6.0 regarding the addition of a local distributed storage solution: DataCore Virtual SAN in the case of Hyper-V 2012 R2, Storage Spaces Direct with Hyper-V 2016, and VSAN 6.2 with vSphere 6.0. You can review that article here.

This article continues from that second article of the series and finishes the addition of a local distributed storage stack to XenServer and RHEV. Once again, our compute unit of choice is the Dell 730xd with two 10-core CPUs and 256 GB of RAM. As stated in the previous post, we need to add some local storage in each node. These compute nodes can, depending on the choices made during the configuration, take up to twenty-four disk drives. For the purposes of this article, we are assuming that data locality is required for performance and that there is a need for an all-flash array. We chose to go with two 400 GB SLC drives for cache and four 800 MLC drives for capacity, giving a total raw capacity per node of 4 TB. There may be further hardware requirements depending on the chosen solutions for each hypervisor, but that will be called out in the relevant vendor sections.

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Cost to Build a New Virtualized Data Center, Part 2a

In part one of Cost to Build a New Virtualized Data Center, we discussed the basic software costs for a virtualized data center based on VMware vSphere 6.0, Citrix XenServer 6.5, Microsoft Hyper-V 2012 R2 and 2016, and Red Hat. If you missed that, please click here to review before continuing.

This post will take that original premise and expand it to include storage with a view to moving the entire environment toward a software-defined data center.

Once again, our compute unit of choice is the Dell 730xd with two 10-core CPUs and 256 GB of RAM. Now, we need to add some local storage in each node. This compute node can, depending on the choices made during the configuration, take up to twenty-four disk drives. For the purposes of this article, we assume that data locality is required for performance, and that there is a need for an all-flash array. We have chosen to go with two 400 GB SLC drives for cache and four 800 MLC drives for capacity. This means that there is a total raw capacity per node of 4 TB. There may be a requirement for further hardware, depending on the chosen solutions for each hypervisor, but that will be called out in the relevant vendor section. Due to the length of this article, we have split it into two sections. This post deals with the costs surrounding vSphere and Hyper-V.

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Cost to Build a New Virtualized Data Center

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been thinking about costs relating to a building a new virtualization-based data center. “What?” I hear you say. “Everywhere is virtualized—there is no such thing as a greenfield site anymore!” I would have said that myself, but in the last month I have come across three, one of which is a company worth over a billion pounds.

During a conversation I had with that company, they informed me that they were going to use a certain vendor for their hypervisor, because it was cheaper. This got me thinking: how much cheaper is it, really? As a result, this is the first in a series of articles looking at a generic cost breakdown for a general-purpose virtualization infrastructure.

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Good Technology to Acquire BoxTone

With the mobile device management (MDM) and enterprise mobility management (EMM) markets still reeling from VMware’s $1.5B purchase of competitor AirWatch, Good Technology has announced that it is purchasing BoxTone for an undisclosed amount. This is a purchase to turn heads: Good Technology is making a bold statement to the world that it, too, is here, and it can and does play in this space.

Read the whole article here

Vyatta – Free Training focussed on use in ESX and Citrix

Vyatta are slowly becoming one of my favourite networking start-ups…
Not only do they have a first class Router and Firewall/VPN product – boasting higher performance than Cisco – that they give to the community (here), they now offer free training at the Vyatta University!

Back in March, Vyatta Core reached v6.0 providing additional features that make their product more attractive to the enterprise.

  • Netflow / sFlow logging and analysis
  • 802.11 wireless LAN – (access point + base station)
  • Binary image installation – (version mgmt)
  • IPv6 readiness (core routing and firewall)
  • Firewall enhancements
    • IPv6 firewall
    • P2P firewall
    • time-based and zone-based firewall rules
  • QoS Enhancements

You may have read my post on using Vyatta as a Router-in-a-box for VMware and Citrix…
Seeing how this is such an attractive use case for this product, Vyatta have published a course detailing  installation, verification and basic configuration of Vyatta OVF and XVA virtual appliances for adding routing & security to VMware ESX and XenServer environments.

To sign up for the free video click here or to view all Vyatta training offerings click here

I very much like Vyatta’s approach, offering the Core Edition to the community with support subscription available as an uplift and it is even more refreshing to see Training following in the footsteps.
A strong community and easy access to resources  satisfies engineers and will yield a greater amount of knowledgeable/certified individuals should Vyatta choose to go down this route.

Perhaps more Networking vendors could learn from this…