Tag: Facebook

WHAT EXACTLY IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

The world is abuzz with rhetoric about artificial intelligence and machine learning. These terms appear to be used interchangeably, and the perception that they are both the same side of the coin can lead to confusion. So, what are the differences?

First, let’s consider what AI is not. It is not Skynet (yet), and it is not HAL 9000 (yet), although sometimes IBM Watson appears to be getting there.

Will you take the Red pill or the Blue Pill

Will you take the Red Pill or the Blue PillIn the broader sense of the term, artificial intelligence is the concept of computers dealing with situations related to data and figuring out for themselves the best way to do something or improving on a method for undertaking a task. Machine learning is the current top of the pile in AI techniques.

So, basically, AI is an all-encompassing term for algorithms that look at data. However, this is too simplistic an idea.

Previously Published on TVP Strategy (The Virtualization Practice)

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Round One in Social Media and First Amendment Rights

I recently wrote an article about a potential class action court case being brought against the President of the United States by the Knight Foundation. In the article, I posited that public servants who use their private social media accounts to make work-related statements may run the risk of causing their accounts to become public domain, considered a government mouthpiece and subject to First Amendment protections. It seems that the first salvo has been fired with regard to legal matters concerning social media and the First Amendment to the US Constitution. In the recent case Brian C. Davison v. Loudoun County Board of Supervisors, et al, heard in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, it was held that a local politician had violated the free speech rights of a constituent whom she had banned from her Facebook page. The judge said the case raised important questions about constitutional restrictions that apply to the social media accounts of elected officials. It seems that US jurisprudence is moving in the directions I alluded to in my previous post.

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