Tag: GCP

PERTH IS LOVELY TO VISIT, BUT IT’S NOT CLOUDY: SD-WAN TO THE RESCU

On February 19, my colleague Edward Haletky wrote a piece on scale. In it, he highlights that scale is not just about 20,000 desktops and 3,000 virtual hosts. Rather, there are many other metrics that could and should be considered with regard to scale.

I am currently living in Perth in Western Australia. Perth holds a rather dubious record in that is it is the most remote capital city in the world. “Wait, Canberra is the capital of Australia,” you might say, and you would be correct. However, Australia operates in a federal manner and is made up of states and territories, and Perth is the capital of Western Australia. Why am I saying all this? One word, really: cloud. Living in Perth, our nearest AWSAzure, and GCP zones are in Sydney, 3,300 kilometers (2,000 miles) away on the east coast. Oracle Cloud? Again, Sydney. OVH? Yes, Sydney. Softlayer? Wait, it has a zone in Melbourne, but that is still 2,700 kilometers (1,700 miles) from Perth. As you can see, we are quite isolated. Physics rather than doctrine limits Perth’s access to public cloud.

Previously Published on TVP Strategy (The Virtualization Practice)

—– Read More —–

Managing a Multicloud

There is no denying that the future of cloud is not just with a single provider, capable as AzureAWS and the other public providers are. For true data protection, your information needs to be in three separate locations, and with the rise of data sovereignty, there is a need for data to be kept within the boundaries of a nation-state. GDPR will place other obligations on companies and their data compliance. Smaller countries will suffer more than larger ones, with their multiple regions and zones per country per cloud provider. Smaller countries like the UK will have problems, as a single provider will not have three regions for true resiliency. Microsoft, for example, will have two regions in the UK for Azure (London and Cardiff) and two for Office 365 (Durham and London). Amazon will only have a single AWS zone: London. (Europe retains Frankfurt, Ireland, and Paris.) The other public cloud providers do not fare much better. Post-GDPR, data sovereignty will be front and center. So, what exactly can you do if you want, need, or desire to be totally in the public cloud: sell your customers in Europe and the world and not fall foul of transnational data-protection laws? A multicloud may be the answer.

Multicloud Puppet Master

Let’s look quickly at the main market providers: India, China, and the US. How they can remain compliant?

Previously Published on TVP Strategy (The Virtualization Practice)

—– Read More —–