HP and the Journey to the Multiverse

In the beginning, there was Hewlett and there was Packard, and they formed a company called Hewlett-Packard (HP) and the rest, as they say, is history. Yes Hewlett-Packard picked up some companies along the way: DEC, Compaq, Autonomy, and EDS, to name a few. HP had its fingers in many pies, acquiring numerous technology companies while attempting to become a one-stop provider of everything: storage (3PAR, LeftHand Networks), compute (Compaq, Neoware), networking (Metrix Network Systems, Colubris Networks, 3Com, Aruba). It also acquired various software companies (Persist Technologies, Novadigm, RLX Technologies, Opsware, Autonomy) and professional service providers (Atos Origin Middle East Group, CGNZ, ManageOne, EDS), among others along the way. Things seemed to be going the right way for it, but then along came this slightly disruptive technology called virtualization. HP the hardware company weathered it. Now we are in the cloud era, and everybody is doing everything they can to become software defined, virtual SANs, virtual networks—the list goes on.

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Oracle v. HP: Yet Another Rumble in the Jungle for the DB Giant

One of the most litigious companies in the valley is Oracle. It is currently in the throes of planning an appeal against a judgement over its Java product.

It is well known that HP and Oracle do not play nice in the corporate playground. Larry Ellison famously stated in 2010 that it would be “virtually impossible” for the two companies to work together in the future. This occurred after HP sued its former CEO Mark Hurd for taking a position as Oracle’s co-president after having resigned, reportedly under pressure from the HP board.

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There is another high-profile and long-running legal case going on between HP and Oracle. This particular disagreement concerns alleged breach of contract. The root of this case hinges on Oracle’s decision in March of 2011 to drop Itanium support in all future product development. The crux of it rests on the interpretation of a clause in an agreement signed by the two companies in the wake of Oracle’s hiring of Mark Hurd.

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